Species Thesaurus

Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Fabales > Fabaceae > Parkia

Parkia speciosa

Taxonomy


Accepted Name
Parkia speciosa

In Other Languages
Indonesian
pete, petai papan, peuteuy

Javanese
petai gede, pete, segobang, petai pare

Malay
chou dou, petai, petah, patai, patag, nyiring, cong dou

Thai
sator, sataw, sator dan, sator kow, to dan, to khao

fil
u’pang

Kingdom
Plantae

Phylum
Tracheophyta

Class
Magnoliopsida

Order
Fabales

Family
Fabaceae

Genus
Parkia

Distribution and conservation

Country
Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand

Establisment Means
native

Threat Status
Least concern

Subject
nan

Properties

Biology
P. speciosa is pollinated by bats, and birds disperse the seed pods. The peak flowering and fruiting season coincides with the period between August and October in its native range each year. There is also an observed smaller peak between January and march. Domesticated trees take up to 7 years to mature.
Ecology
PESTS AND DISEASES Wood has no resistance to any kind of insect or wood borer attack or to wood-staining fungi; sapwood is susceptible to Lyctus borers. In the Far East, moth larvae (Argyroploce illepida and Mussidia pectinicornella) attack the seeds. The helmeted hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) eats the fruits. In Malaysia, the banded leaf monkey (Presbytis melalophus) is known to eat the fruits as well as the flowers and buds. The black-banded squirrel and the slender squirrel are often seen stripping pieces of the outer bark from P. speciosa in Malaysia to eat the inner bark or cambium.
Management
Tree Management For Optimal Growth Ample Space And Light Are Necessary. Germplasm Management Seeds Of P. Speciosa Loose Their Viability Very Rapidly
.

Uses
Products Food
Seeds are sometimes used as a vegetable; they have a garlic flavour and a very strong odour. Due to the foul smell of the green seeds, they are sometimes referred to as the ‘evil-smelling bean’. Half-ripe pods are pickled in salt. The young leaves and fresh parts of the flower stalks can also be eaten raw.
Essential Oil
Seeds of P. speciosa contain cystine.
Fibre
The wood is used in the manufacture of paper.
Medicine
The seeds are known to be hypoglycemic (reducing blood sugar level), and is used traditionally for treating kidney pain, cancer, diabetes, hepatalgia, oedema, nephritis, colic, cholera and as an anthelmintic; also applied externally to wounds and ulcers. The seeds are also valued as a carminative.
Services Shade Or Shelter
P. speciosa is sometimes planted as a shade tree, for example, for coffee plantations and in nurseries.
Timber
Parkia yields a usually lightweight, occasionally medium-weight hardwood with a density of 350-810 kg/m³ at 15% mc. Heartwood white, yellow-white or pale yellowish-brown, with paler and darker streaks in older trees; not clearly differentiated from the rather wide sapwood, which is paler in colour; very occasionally, a darker-coloured core is present. Grain straight or slightly interlocked; texture moderately coarse and uneven. Wood with unpleasant garlic or beanlike odour when fresh. Shrinkage upon seasoning is low; degrading during seasoning is mainly due to insect attack and blue stain; end-checks have been observed in P. speciosa. Air-drying takes 3-4 months for boards 13 mm thick and 4. 5-5 months for those 38 mm thick. Wood is non-durable with a service life of about 1 year, but preservative treatment is easy. The wood of Parkia is used locally for temporary light construction, carpentry, furniture and cabinet making, mouldings, interior finish, cladding, concrete shuttering, boxes and crates, matches, clogs, disposable chopsticks and fishnet floats. General utility plywood has been manufactured from the wood.

See Also

External Link

Citation

Orwa C, Mutua A , Kindt R , Jamnadass R, Simons A. 2009. Agroforestree Database:a tree reference and selection guide version 4.0 (http://www.worldagroforestry.org/af/treedb/)


Reference


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