Can forests and smallholders live in harmony in Africa?

Posted by

Xiaoxue, W.

Schoneveld, G.C.

Gallagher, E.J.

Ihalainen, M.

van der Haar, S.

Arwari, M.

griculture continues to present the biggest threat to forests worldwide. Some experts predict that crop production needs to be doubled by 2050 to feed the world at the current pace of population growth and dietary changes toward higher meat and dairy consumption. Scientists generally agree that productivity increase alone is not going to do the trick. Cropland expansion will be needed, most likely at the expense of large swathes of tropical forests – as much as 200million hectares by some estimates..

Nowhere is this competition for land between forests and agriculture more acute than in Africa. Its deforestation rate has surpassed those of Latin America and Southeast Asia. Sadly, the pace shows no sign of slowing down. Africa’s agriculture sector needs to feed its burgeoning populations- the fastest growing in the world. Africa will also continue to attract agricultural investments as investors turn away from rising pressures against forest conversion elsewhere in the world. What’s more, for the millions of unemployed African youth, a vibrant agriculture sector will deliver jobs and spur structural transformation of the rural economy. Taken together, the pressures on forests are immense. Unless interventions are made urgently, a large portion of Africa’s forests will be lost in the coming decades – one farm plot at a time.

Source link: Can forests and smallholders live in harmony in Africa?

Back to top

Sign up to our monthly newsletter

Connect with us