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  • Wild meat and food security

Wild meat and food security

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Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video shows what bushmeat means for many rural people in Colombia (Spanish with English subtitles).

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  • Future solutions for bushmeat in Colombia

Future solutions for bushmeat in Colombia

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Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video from Colombia is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • Wild meat a generalized phenomenon in rural Colombia

Wild meat a generalized phenomenon in rural Colombia

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Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video from Colombia is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • Wild meat threatened by deforestation and mining

Wild meat threatened by deforestation and mining

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FTA

Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video from Colombia shows some of the challenges of the rural population to access bushmeat.

It is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • Wild meat between legitimacy and illegality

Wild meat between legitimacy and illegality

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FTA

Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video shows the challenges of the rural population that still very much depends on bushmeat as a source of food.

It is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • Wild meat and its cultural importance

Wild meat and its cultural importance

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FTA

Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This short video shows the cultural importance of bushmeat for many rural populations, here in Colombia.

It is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • Altitudinal filtering of large-tree species explains above-ground biomass variation in an Atlantic Central African rain forest

Altitudinal filtering of large-tree species explains above-ground biomass variation in an Atlantic Central African rain forest

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Authors: Gonmadje, C.; Picard, N.; Gourlet-Fleury, S.; Réjou-Méchain, M.; Freycon, V.; Sunderland, T.C.H.; McKey, D.; Doumenge, C.

Patterns in above-ground biomass of tropical forests over short altitudinal gradients are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate the variation of above-ground biomass with altitude in old-growth forests and determine the importance of changes in floristic composition as a cause of this variation. We used a dataset from 15 1-ha permanent plots established from lowland (200 m asl) to submontane forests (900 m asl) in the Ngovayang Massif, south-western Cameroon. We analysed variation over altitude in two specific functional traits, the potential maximum tree height and the wood density. Forest above-ground biomass decreased from 500-600 Mg ha-1 in lowland plots to around 260 Mg ha-1 at the highest altitudes. The contribution to above-ground biomass of large-tree species (dbh = 70 cm) decreased with altitude, while the contribution of smaller trees was constant. Contribution of the Fabaceae subfamily Caesalpinioideae decreased with altitude, while those of Clusiaceae, Phyllanthaceae and Burseraceae increased. While potential maximum tree height significantly decreased, wood specific gravity displayed no trend along the gradient. Finally, the decrease in above-ground biomass along the short altitudinal gradient can be at least partially explained by a shift in species composition, with large-tree species being filtered out at the highest altitudes. These results suggest that global change could lead to significant shifts in the properties of montane forests over time.

Pages: 12p

Publication Year: 2017

ISSN: 0266-4674

Source: Journal of Tropical Ecology

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0266467416000602

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  • A Three-Dimensional View on Soil Biogeochemistry: A Dataset for a Forested Headwater Catchment

A Three-Dimensional View on Soil Biogeochemistry: A Dataset for a Forested Headwater Catchment

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Authors: Gottselig, N.; Wiekenkamp, I.; Weihermüller, L.; Brüggemann, N.; Berns, A.E.; Bogena, H.R.; Borchard, N.; Klumpp, E.; Lücke, A.; Missong, A.; Pütz, T.; Vereecken, H.; Huisman, J.A.; Bol, R.

Current understanding of the variability in soil properties and their relationship to processes and spatial patterns in forested landscapes is limited due to the scarcity of datasets providing such information. Here we present a spatially highly resolved dataset that provides detailed information on the three-dimensional variability of biogeochemical properties in the Wüstebach catchment (western Germany), a long-term environmental observation site of the TERENO (Terrestrial Environmental Observatories) project. High-resolution soil sampling was conducted, and physical and biogeochemical soil parameters were recorded per horizon. The dataset is helpful in the analysis of the spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical properties within soil horizons and with depth through the soil profile. In addition, it shows links between hydrological and biogeochemical properties and processes within the system. Overall, the dataset provides a high-resolution view into (re)cycling, leaching, and storage of nutrients on the catchment scale in a forested headwater catchment.

Publication Year: 2017

ISSN: 1537-2537

Source: Journal of Environmental Quality 46(1): 210-218

DOI: 10.2134/jeq2016.07.0276

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  • Wild meat and armed conflict

Wild meat and armed conflict

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FTA

Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video from Colombia shows some of the challenges of the rural population to access bushmeat.

It is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • Forests, people and wild meat in Chocó

Forests, people and wild meat in Chocó

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FTA

Established by CIFOR in 2011, the Bushmeat Research Initiative (BRI) brings together diverse researchers and practitioners to generate and share knowledge on bushmeat harvesting, marketing and consumption across Latin America, Africa and Asia. The initiative was established under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

This video shows what bushmeat means for the population of Chocó, one of 32 districts of Colombia.

It is in Spanish with English subtitles.

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  • The frankincense tree Boswellia neglecta reveals high potential for restoration of woodlands in the Horn of Africa

The frankincense tree Boswellia neglecta reveals high potential for restoration of woodlands in the Horn of Africa

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Authors: Mulugeta Mokria, Motuma Tolera, Frank J. Sterck, Aster Gebrekirstos, Frans Bongers, Mathieu Decuyper, Ute Sass-Klaassen

Boswellia neglecta S. Moore is a frankincense-producing tree species dominantly found in the dry woodlands of southeastern Ethiopia. Currently, the population of this socio-economically and ecologically important species is threatened by complex anthropogenic and climate change related factors. Evaluation of tree age and its radial growth dynamics in relation to climate variables helps to understand the response of the species to climate change. It is also crucial for sustainable forest resource management and utilization. Dendrochronological and remote-sensing techniques were used to study periodicity of wood formation and leaf phenology and to assess the growth dynamics of B. neglecta. The results show that B. neglecta forms two growth rings per year in the study area. The growth ring structure is characterized by larger vessels at the beginning of each growing season and smaller vessels formed later in the growing season, suggesting adaptation to decreasing soil moisture deficits at the end of the growing season. Seasonality in cambial activity matches with a bimodal leaf phenological pattern. The mean annual radial growth rate of B. neglecta trees is 2.5 mm. Tree age varied between 16 and 28 years, with an average age of 22 years. The young age of these trees indicates recent colonization of B. neglecta in the study region. The growth rate and seasonal canopy greenness (expressed by Normalized Difference Vegetation Index – NDVI) were positively correlated with rainfall, suggesting that rainfall is the main climatic factor controlling growth of B. neglecta. The observed temporal changes in leaf phenology and vessel size across the growth rings indicate that the species is drought tolerant. Therefore, it can be regarded as a key tree species for restoration of moisture-related limited areas across the Horn of Africa.

Published at  Forest Ecology and Management 385 (2017) 16–24

 

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  • Certify and shift blame, or resolve issues? Environmentally and socially responsible global trade and production of timber and tree crops

Certify and shift blame, or resolve issues? Environmentally and socially responsible global trade and production of timber and tree crops

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Authors: Mithöfer, D,; van Noordwijk, M.; Leimona, B.; Cerutti, P.O.

Certification of adherence to social and environmental standards allows companies involved in the (global) trade of commodities to dissociate themselves from negative impacts in the public eye. It can go beyond compliance with legal requirements. Certification can be an attempt to shift blame to uncertified others, but it can also contribute to resolving the underlying issues of concern. We provide a framework for a study of when, where and how certification schemes emerge and evolve, with specific attention to the degree to which underlying issues get addressed. Three strands of literature are combined in this framework (1) the issue–attention cycle as a schematic representation of public concerns shaping policy responses; (2) the management swing potential defined as the gap between best and worst current production systems and the basis for defining standards and (3) global value chains that link distant producers and consumers, and the power relations along these chains, including standards and certification. Based on literature review, we introduce a set of four propositions that inform testable specific hypotheses. We outline questions for reviews, in subsequent papers of this issue, of the experience on timber, oil palm, coffee, cacao and rubber as tropical-forest-margin commodities dominated by global trade.

Publication Year: 2017

ISSN: 2151-3732

Source: International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management 13(1): 72-85

DOI: 10.1080/21513732.2016.1238848

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  • Success from the Ground Up? Participatory Monitoring in Forest Restoration

Success from the Ground Up? Participatory Monitoring in Forest Restoration

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  • FTA events recap from CBD COP13: Restoring forests with community monitoring, letting nature takes its course

FTA events recap from CBD COP13: Restoring forests with community monitoring, letting nature takes its course

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Manuel Guariguata, Principal Scientist on tropical forest ecology and forest management for production and conservation at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), speaks on the sidelines of the 13th Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP13), held from 4-17 December 2016 in Cancun, Mexico.

Learn more about CIFOR’s involvement in CBD COP13 at:
http://www.cifor.org/cifor-at-cbd-cop13/

This research forms part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

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  • Strengths and limitations of participatory forest management and area enclosure: two major state-led forest landscape rehabilitation initiatives in Ethiopia

Strengths and limitations of participatory forest management and area enclosure: two major state-led forest landscape rehabilitation initiatives in Ethiopia

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Presentation by Habte Mariam Kassa, Senior Scientist at the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), at the IUFRO Regional Congress for Asia and Oceania, October 2016, in Bejing, China


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