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  • FTA at GLF: From rainfall recycling to landscape restoration

FTA at GLF: From rainfall recycling to landscape restoration

An aerial shot of Southern Nepal. Photo by Chandra Shekhar Karki/CIFOR
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An aerial shot of Southern Nepal. Photo by Chandra Shekhar Karki/CIFOR

Following the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry’s (FTA) successful involvement in the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF) Peatlands earlier this year, FTA is anticipating productive involvement once again in the upcoming GLF Bonn on Dec. 19-20, 2017.

Of note is a Discussion Forum organized by FTA and the  International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO), ‘Rainfall Recycling’ as a Landscape Function: Connecting SDGs 6, 13 and 15, which will shed light on the role of forests and trees in the climate debate.

It will build on an online symposium held earlier this year and on a scientific review paper on the relationship between forests and water titled Trees, forests and water: Cool insights for a hot world. The discussion will also cover preliminary highlights of the current Global Forest Expert Panel (GFEP) on Forests and Water, which is expected to issue a policy relevant global assessment report in July 2018.

In an article following the online symposium, FTA Director Vincent Gitz and Meine van Noordwijk, both of whom will take part in the Discussion Forum, stated that “forests and trees are drivers of key mechanisms that govern the water cycle, atmospheric moisture, precipitation and climate at the local, regional and continental levels. In other words, forests and trees can help manage the water cycle not only from the well-known watershed perspective, but from a precipitation-shed perspective, with key implications for climate regulation. Geopolitical implications are huge: Who has the right to influence rainfall elsewhere?”

As research suggests that vegetation plays a critical role in the frequency and intensity of rainfall, the Discussion Forum will examine the role of forests in regulating the water cycle. This science is relevant for policies and implementation efforts related to climate change, land restoration, landscape management and food security.

A large patch of lemongrass in the Chisapani Community Forest. Photo by Chandra Shekhar Karki/CIFOR

In particular, the session aims to display the latest scientific findings on rainfall recycling and climate regulation in relation to forests and tree cover; explore the implications of these new scientific insights on climate, land, water and related policies and actions; and sketch a new agenda on water/land and climate, for coordinated science-to-policy linkages, from cross-cutting policy integration to implementation on the ground, and triggering interest for institutional and donor support.

“These findings have significant implications for policy and action, and for research – particularly for FTA research – and what it can do or the tools it can provide to inform and underpin this new agenda,” Gitz and Van Noordwijk wrote in the article.

Read more: FTA-IUFRO Discussion Forum

FTA is also involved in organizing two other Discussion Forums: Enhancing tenure security and gender equality in the context of forest landscape restoration, in which the panel will seek to identify conflicts and synergies between forest restoration, tenure security and gender equality; and Agroforestry’s role in landscape restoration: Connecting SDGs 15, 13, 1 and 3, which will focus on the accomplishments and future of agroforestry as a path toward sustainable landscape restoration. All Discussion Forums can be viewed online via the GLF website.

The GLF is expected to be a vibrant event involving world leaders, climate negotiators, policy makers, development practitioners, private sector representatives, world-class scientists, civil society and the media to accelerate action towards the creation of more resilient, equitable, profitable, productive and healthy landscapes.

For those attending the GLF in person, there will be many opportunities to see and hear from FTA scientists, including other Discussion Forums in which Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) scientists will participate. FTA will also be well-represented in the Inclusive Landscapes Finance Pavilion and Restoration Pavilion, as well as TED-style Landscape Talks on topics ranging from integrated landscape approaches to peatlands.

Read more: FTA at GLF

Many notable plenary speakers are expected at the GLF, from actor Alec Baldwin who will give a video address, to Miss Rwanda 2016 Uwase Hirwa Honorine, the President of Mauritius Her Excellency Ameenah Gurib-Fakim, UN Environment Executive Director Erik Solheim, yogi and spiritual leader Sadhguru, UN Under-Secretary and UNCCD Chief Monique Barbut, indigenous leader Marcos Terena, French intellectual Jacques Attali who will also give a video address, cultural instigator Scott Goodson and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Rob Burnet.

Meanwhile, over 200 young people are set to play the role of ambassadors, volunteers and coordinators over the two-day event, in a nod to youth integration and mainstreaming. Indigenous leaders from North America and the Pacific will also be present at the Indigenous People’s Pavilion to share their experiences and highlight the role of pastoralism as a viable livelihood system across significant landscapes worldwide, in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals, regional and national policy.

In addition, this year’s Wangari Maathai Award recipients, in honor of the late Nobel laureate, Kenyan environmental activist and founder of the Green Belt Movement, will be announced during the GLF.

Dubbed the world’s largest gathering on sustainability issues, the GLF will welcome more than 45 different organizations, with FTA among them. The GLF’s five key themes – Food and Livelihoods, Finance, Rights, Restoration, and Measuring Progress – are set to shape the event.

With the GLF’s key themes being of direct relevance to the work of FTA, the program is well-placed to help facilitate productive and valuable discussions, both to inform its own work and to support shared goals.

GLF Bonn 2017: Register to attend in person or watch online.


The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) is supported by CGIAR Fund Donors.

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  • FTA at GLF: From rainfall recycling to landscape restoration

FTA at GLF: From rainfall recycling to landscape restoration

An aerial shot of Southern Nepal. Photo by Chandra Shekhar Karki/CIFOR
Posted by

FTA COMMUNICATIONS TEAM

An aerial shot of Southern Nepal. Photo by Chandra Shekhar Karki/CIFOR

Following the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry’s (FTA) successful involvement in the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF) Peatlands earlier this year, FTA is anticipating productive involvement once again in the upcoming GLF Bonn on Dec. 19-20, 2017.

Of note is a Discussion Forum organized by FTA and the  International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO), ‘Rainfall Recycling’ as a Landscape Function: Connecting SDGs 6, 13 and 15, which will shed light on the role of forests and trees in the climate debate.

It will build on an online symposium held earlier this year and on a scientific review paper on the relationship between forests and water titled Trees, forests and water: Cool insights for a hot world. The discussion will also cover preliminary highlights of the current Global Forest Expert Panel (GFEP) on Forests and Water, which is expected to issue a policy relevant global assessment report in July 2018.

In an article following the online symposium, FTA Director Vincent Gitz and Meine van Noordwijk, both of whom will take part in the Discussion Forum, stated that “forests and trees are drivers of key mechanisms that govern the water cycle, atmospheric moisture, precipitation and climate at the local, regional and continental levels. In other words, forests and trees can help manage the water cycle not only from the well-known watershed perspective, but from a precipitation-shed perspective, with key implications for climate regulation. Geopolitical implications are huge: Who has the right to influence rainfall elsewhere?”

As research suggests that vegetation plays a critical role in the frequency and intensity of rainfall, the Discussion Forum will examine the role of forests in regulating the water cycle. This science is relevant for policies and implementation efforts related to climate change, land restoration, landscape management and food security.

A large patch of lemongrass in the Chisapani Community Forest. Photo by Chandra Shekhar Karki/CIFOR

In particular, the session aims to display the latest scientific findings on rainfall recycling and climate regulation in relation to forests and tree cover; explore the implications of these new scientific insights on climate, land, water and related policies and actions; and sketch a new agenda on water/land and climate, for coordinated science-to-policy linkages, from cross-cutting policy integration to implementation on the ground, and triggering interest for institutional and donor support.

“These findings have significant implications for policy and action, and for research – particularly for FTA research – and what it can do or the tools it can provide to inform and underpin this new agenda,” Gitz and Van Noordwijk wrote in the article.

Read more: FTA-IUFRO Discussion Forum

FTA is also involved in organizing two other Discussion Forums: Enhancing tenure security and gender equality in the context of forest landscape restoration, in which the panel will seek to identify conflicts and synergies between forest restoration, tenure security and gender equality; and Agroforestry’s role in landscape restoration: Connecting SDGs 15, 13, 1 and 3, which will focus on the accomplishments and future of agroforestry as a path toward sustainable landscape restoration. All Discussion Forums can be viewed online via the GLF website.

The GLF is expected to be a vibrant event involving world leaders, climate negotiators, policy makers, development practitioners, private sector representatives, world-class scientists, civil society and the media to accelerate action towards the creation of more resilient, equitable, profitable, productive and healthy landscapes.

For those attending the GLF in person, there will be many opportunities to see and hear from FTA scientists, including other Discussion Forums in which Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) scientists will participate. FTA will also be well-represented in the Inclusive Landscapes Finance Pavilion and Restoration Pavilion, as well as TED-style Landscape Talks on topics ranging from integrated landscape approaches to peatlands.

Read more: FTA at GLF

Many notable plenary speakers are expected at the GLF, from actor Alec Baldwin who will give a video address, to Miss Rwanda 2016 Uwase Hirwa Honorine, the President of Mauritius Her Excellency Ameenah Gurib-Fakim, UN Environment Executive Director Erik Solheim, yogi and spiritual leader Sadhguru, UN Under-Secretary and UNCCD Chief Monique Barbut, indigenous leader Marcos Terena, French intellectual Jacques Attali who will also give a video address, cultural instigator Scott Goodson and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Rob Burnet.

Meanwhile, over 200 young people are set to play the role of ambassadors, volunteers and coordinators over the two-day event, in a nod to youth integration and mainstreaming. Indigenous leaders from North America and the Pacific will also be present at the Indigenous People’s Pavilion to share their experiences and highlight the role of pastoralism as a viable livelihood system across significant landscapes worldwide, in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals, regional and national policy.

In addition, this year’s Wangari Maathai Award recipients, in honor of the late Nobel laureate, Kenyan environmental activist and founder of the Green Belt Movement, will be announced during the GLF.

Dubbed the world’s largest gathering on sustainability issues, the GLF will welcome more than 45 different organizations, with FTA among them. The GLF’s five key themes – Food and Livelihoods, Finance, Rights, Restoration, and Measuring Progress – are set to shape the event.

With the GLF’s key themes being of direct relevance to the work of FTA, the program is well-placed to help facilitate productive and valuable discussions, both to inform its own work and to support shared goals.

GLF Bonn 2017: Register to attend in person or watch online.


The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) is supported by CGIAR Fund Donors.

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  • “To me, the keyword of this Summit is integration”: Peter Holmgren at Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit 2016

“To me, the keyword of this Summit is integration”: Peter Holmgren at Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit 2016

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CIFOR’s Director General Peter Holmgren delivers a keynote address on 3 August 2016 at the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam, an important event under the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

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  • Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit invitation video

Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit invitation video

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Hon. Dato Ali Apong, Minister of Primary Resources and Tourism for Brunei Darussalam invites you to the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit 2016.

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  • FTA at Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit: Empowering smallholders

FTA at Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit: Empowering smallholders

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Originally published at CIFOR’s Forests News

Mediating the push and pull of agricultural expansion and conservation is no easy task. Add to that smallholders – who play a crucial role in producing agricultural commodities but whose economic disenfranchisement can incline to unsustainable practices – and the situation becomes even more complex.

With increasing corporate commitments to eliminate deforestation from supply chains, the integral, and precarious, situation of smallholders must be addressed. But how can companies help to empower them, disincentivizing deforestation and unsustainable practices? What must government, civil society and the financial sector do? And, what would a successful smallholder empowerment project look like?

At the upcoming Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit in Brunei from 3 to 5 August, these questions will be discussed by diverse representatives from government, business, civil society and the research community.

Pablo Pacheco is principal scientist with the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and coordinator of the Trade, Investment and Governance theme of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry. He will be chairing the smallholder session at the summit. In an interview on the sidelines of the recent Global Landscapes Forum: The Investment Case he addressed the thorny question of smallholders, investing and sustainability.

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  • FTA event coverage: Agro + forestry = SDGs

FTA event coverage: Agro + forestry = SDGs

Farming Gliricidia and Maize. Photo: Nicolas Vereecken
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Originally published at Agroforestry World Blog in 2 parts (here part 2)

Farming Gliricidia and Maize. Photo: Nicolas Vereecken
Farming Gliricidia and Maize. Photo: Nicolas Vereecken

The new global agenda has one goal: a sustainable Earth. The contribution of agroforestry in achieving this was discussed in detail at Asia-Pacific Forestry Week (APFW), FTA Flagship 3 coordinator Meine van Noordwijk led the charge. This blog by Rob Finlayson gives an account of his presentation and how well his arguments resonated with experts at the conference. The blog was shortened and edited for the FTA website.

All the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are interconnected; we can’t achieve one without the others,’ says Meine van Noordwijk, chief science advisor with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and coordinator of the landscapes Flagship of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA).

He divides the SDGs into six groups and argues that agroforestry relates to all of them:

  • Agroforestry clearly contributes to the SDGs around poverty reduction (SDG 1) and economic growth (SDG 8) through provision of income from tree products;
  • For the SDGs on zero hunger (2), good health and well-being (3) and responsible consumption and production (12) agroforestry is very relevant through the provision of nutritious food and all the other benefits that trees can bring to a household;
  • Clean water and sanitation (6) and life below water (14) link to healthy, agroforested watersheds and coastal agroforests, including mangroves;
  • Affordable and clean energy (7), industry, innovation and infrastructure (9) and sustainable cities and communities (11) need trees as sources of bioenergy, including by-products from fruit and shade trees. Green cities can be cooled down by trees.
  • Of course trees feature critically for SDGs 13, keeping climate change in check and 15, conserving biodiversity;
  • The other SDGs (dealing with issues such as conflict, equity, transparency and gender), relate to the so-called ‘soft’ side of agroforestry, which is about people and their interactions with each other and the environment.
A farmer harvests plantain from a rubber-based agroforest. Photo: ICRAF
A farmer harvests plantain from a rubber-based agroforest. Photo: ICRAF

To achieve the SDGs, ‘we need to combine knowledge systems’, explains van Noordwijk: Knowledge can not only come from science, but also has to stem from local and indigenous sources, from the public sector and policy makers, and many others.

‘We need to understand how knowledge is created in each of these arenas and how to use these experiences to change the trajectory our world has been on,’ says van Noordwijk.

Many different types of agroforestry can already be seen around the world: the mechanised row-cropping favoured in the European Union, swidden systems in tropical forests, rice fields surrounded by planted fruit and timber trees.

‘There is no single way to define agroforestry other than: it is the interface between farmers and forests,’ he adds.

How agroforestry can help the SDGs

  • To meet the SDGs, land productivity in both agriculture and forestry will have to increase. Agroforestry is one of the most efficient ways of using land. As a land-use system in-between forest and open-field agriculture, it can—with appropriate combinations of trees, crops and livestock—provide a range of goods, benefits and services simultaneously, such as nutritious food, renewable energy and clean water while conserving biodiversity. Efficient, multifunctional land use, such as agroforestry, supports ‘sustainable intensification’.
  • Segregating forest land from agrarian communities leads to conflicts that reduce land productivity and increase inequity. Agroforestry needs to become an institutional response to contested resources, allowing enhancement of gender and social equity. There is no valid method of drawing a line between agriculture and forestry. The only validity is ‘agro + forestry’.
  • Development challenges are in part the result of the sectoral approach that dominates government systems, with the various SDGs attributable to separate conventions and ministries. Agroforestry as an integrated mindset can help create synergy between the SDGs in multifunctional landscapes, breaking out of the artificially-constructed institutional silos.

Expert from various countries of the region responded positively to Meine van Noordwijk’s arguments.

Imelda-Bacudo-190x300Imelda Bacudo of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)-German Programme on Response to Climate Change in Agriculture and Forestry said it was hard to see the desired convergence of forestry and agriculture, yet this was something that was much needed.

‘We have to move forward on how to merge them’, she urged. ‘What’s preventing us from doing this is that we are challenged by administrative borders. Throughout the region, ministries of agriculture and of forestry are divided or if they are in one ministry they are divided within. We need to address this problem. It’s the biggest challenge we face.’

Nguyen-Tuong-Van-202x300Nguyen Tuong Van of VNFOREST, Viet Nam, agreed: ‘There are many links between agroforestry and the Sustainable Development Goals and Viet Nam already has a lot of agroforestry models.

But agroforestry still falls between forestry and agriculture. Even though in Viet Nam we have one ministry, the sectors are two different departments and neither takes care of agroforestry. We need to combine these.

But negotiating between departments even in one ministry is a big problem. ICRAF can support countries to do this. Agroforestry should be under one institution. This is important for attracting investment and driving action.’

Wiratno-291x300The same case applies in Indonesia, said Wiratno, Director of Social Forestry Land Preparation of the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry and chairperson of the ASEAN Social Forestry Network secretariat.

‘Sectoral egoism is very big. This is our common challenge. We have an agroforestry program in which we have to support 50,000 ha every year and also deliver state forests to local communities,’ he said, referring to the government program of allocating 5.5 million hectares of forest to local people within the next four years towards a total of 12.7 million hectares by 2020.

Rex-Cruz-(left) and-Hendri-Binahon
Rex Cruz (left) and Hendri Binahon

According to Hendri Binahon, a Philippine farmer and successful practitioner of agroforestry, the greatest challenge is ‘changing the mindset of farmers, extensionists, government officials, policy makers and then we can have agroforestry in most of the landscapes in tropical countries’.

Rex Cruz of the University of the Philippines at Los Baños, thinks that van Noordwijk’s arguments cannot be contested in the face of a growing population and increasing development: ‘It is inevitable we will change the natural face of our landscape. The only question is how far do we want to change it and how can we use agroforestry as a strategy to generate the types of goods and services we demand from the land.’

Dian-Sukmaja-300x169Dian Sukmajaya of the ASEAN Economic Community Department of the ASEAN Secretariat called on policy makers to change their mindset – and policies in order to overcome landscape segregation. ‘Agroforestry has been practiced for thousands of years, contributes directly to SDG 17 and others, and offers efficient use of land.’

Photos of experts at APFW by Rob Finlayson

 

 

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  • FTA researchers to present achievements at Asia Pacific Forestry Week

FTA researchers to present achievements at Asia Pacific Forestry Week

L’agriculture est la principale cause de déforestation. Mais elle reste une activité essentielle pour les communautés locales de la Péninsule du Yucatán. Pour lutter contre la déforestation, il est primordial de trouver des alternatives de productions agricoles plus durables. Photo aérienne prise dans la Péninsule du Yucatán au Mexique série - « La Forêt du Yucatán vue du ciel »
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The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) will present key achievements at the FAO Asia Pacific Forestry Week 22-26 February in the Philippines.

FTA scientists will hold a discussion forum titled The research agenda for forested landscapes in 2017-2022: partnership opportunitiesThe event is linked to the event stream Our green future – green investment and growing our natural assets.

Participants will have the opportunity to give feedback to the proposal for the next phase of FTA research which is more closely aligned with the Sustainable Devleopment Goals and is just being finalized

The discussion is planned to take place in the evening of Thursday, 25 February, 9pm. Stay tuned to find out about the exact timing and location or contact Meine van Noordwijk at [email protected]

Tentative program (90 minutes):

  • Meine van Noordwijk, Program Leader in FTA: the FTA research program in the global development landscape — the top 20 questions in forestry
  • Christopher Martius, Program Leader in FTA: the FTA work program 2017-2020 — options for engagement
  • Breakout into workgroup sessions: What are the research questions in forestry for the next 6 years?
  • Plenary: report back from workgroups and discussion “How can participants engage with the FTA program?”

Three of the six FTA partners, the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Bioversity International, are co-convening the event.


Also see CIFOR’s program at Asia Pacific Forestry Week


Background

FTA is working in Asia, Africa and Latin America, from the ‘tree’ to the ‘global’ scale, combining many disciplines and tackling various issues.

The program benefits from long-term connections with selected landscapes, but also works at the national scale. Researchers are striving to understand the different roles forests and all trees play for ecologies, economies and societies.

Impact-driven and innovative, FTA seeks to enhance the management and use of forests, agroforestry and tree genetic resources across the landscape.

The existing cooperation with academic, government, non-governmental and private sector partners is valued and the six FTA centers are keen to explore new partnerships for the second phase.

FTA responds to the urgent need for a strong and sustained research focus on forest management and governance, because of the crucial role forests play in confronting some of the most important challenges of our time: climate change, poverty, and food insecurity.

The partnership within in the CGIAR has now completed its first phase of research on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry: Livelihoods, Landscapes and Governance.

The research outcomes from this work are already influencing policy-makers and practitioners, for example in designing Payment for Ecosystem Services schemes and in increasing crop yields.

 

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  • GLF partners make the connections: an invitation

GLF partners make the connections: an invitation

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