• Home
  • Highlights from the 3rd Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit

Highlights from the 3rd Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit

Posted by

FTA COMMUNICATIONS TEAM

Themed “Protecting forests and people, supporting economic growth”, the 2018 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit (APRS) focused on conservation, livelihoods and investment over three days of international dialogue and knowledge-sharing in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

The first day kicked off with an opening ceremony featuring APRS host Indonesia’s Minister of Environment and Forestry, Siti Nurabaya, and Australian Minister of Environment and Energy Josh Frydenberg, followed by statements from regional ministers and two high-level panels highlighting the role of forests in countries’ Nationally Determined Contributions.

Read more: FTA at the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit

Originally published by CIFOR.

  • Home
  • Welcome to the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit 2018

Welcome to the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit 2018

Posted by

FTA COMMUNICATIONS TEAM

The 2018 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit (APRS) took place in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, from April 23 to 25. APRS provides the opportunity for countries across Asia-Pacific to showcase their work on forest conservation and demonstrate their progress on implementation of the Paris Climate Change Agreement.

The CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) and the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) were the 2018 APRS science and engagement partners, backstopping the summit from the science side. The host country partner for APRS 2018 was the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and the coordinating partner was the Australian Government’s Department of the Environment and Energy.

Read more: FTA at the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit 

Originally published by CIFOR. 

  • Home
  • View from the Pacific: ‘Climate change is real’

View from the Pacific: ‘Climate change is real’

Malinau, East Kalimantan - Indonesia, 2008. ©Center For International Forestry Research/Douglas Sheil
Posted by

cifor

Asia Pacific – Pacific island leaders expressed their concerns about climate change in the region at the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit, held from 3-5 August in Brunei Darussalam.

Government representatives from Fiji, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu spoke about the dangers of rising sea levels and extreme weather events for Pacific island nations, and urged the region to take action by conserving forests for climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Leaders also pledged their commitment to conserving forests for better local resilience to climate change, among other benefits.

“Forests will continue to play a vital role in many countries within the Asia-Pacific region in contributing to national economic development, food security, employment and in supporting livelihoods in rural areas,” said Osea Naiqamu, Fiji’s Minister for Fisheries and Forests.

“Climate change is real for Fiji. Not only for Fiji, but for small islands states like Kiribati, Tuvalu, all those other small island states in the Pacific,” he added.

Hear more from Pacific island leaders in the video below:

x


This topic was featured at the
Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit
3-5 August 2016
See event details here

logo-b-a-c-40-b

See the rest of the story at mysite.com

Related:
Bentang alam dan sumber makanan sehat anak
Indonesia: Biofuels from palm oil and power from tree plantations?
Memutuskan manfaat terbaik melalui metoda permainan

Source: Forests News English

  • Home
  • Reversing deforestation, restoring landscapes

Reversing deforestation, restoring landscapes

Posted by

FTA

Photo: CIFOR/Boy Haqi
A woman in Aceh carries firewood from the forest for cooking. Forest landscape restoration considers the diverse values of forests, including to support livelihoods. CIFOR/Boy Haqi

By Catriona Croft-Cusworth, originally published at CIFOR’s Forests News

Asia Pacific – Regional leaders gathered this month in Brunei Darussalam to discuss ways to slow, halt and reverse deforestation in the Asia-Pacific. But what does it mean to ‘reverse’ deforestation? And how can it be done without reversing the rapid development that supports the economies and livelihoods of the region?

In discussion at the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit, experts in government, research and development addressed these questions in a panel session titled ‘Restoring our rainforests’. Panelists in the session argued that reversing deforestation does not simply mean reforestation, but requires an approach that integrates the goal of restoring forests with other diverse objectives within the forest landscape, including livelihoods, economic growth and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Li Jia, representing the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and as the moderator for the session, described this in her organization’s terms as ‘forest landscape restoration’ (FLR).

Taking a landscape approach to restoration, FLR integrates the goal of reforestation with other land uses, including sustainable agriculture and agroforestry to support economic development.

Chetan Kumar, another member of the panel from IUCN, explained further:

“It is important to recognize that [forest] landscape restoration is about regaining ecological functionality as well as enhancing human wellbeing. So we are not just talking about carbon benefits or adaptation, but a whole range of benefits,” he said.

GLOBAL COMMITMENTS, LOCAL PRESSURES

In the densely populated and rapidly developing Asia-Pacific region, forests are under pressure to meet local needs, build national economies and contribute to global goals.

“Many developing countries in Asia-Pacific regions, they would like to increase the economic wellbeing of their people. However, at the same time this often in the field translates into degradation drivers for forests and pressures for forests,” Jia said.

Rainforests in the Asia-Pacific are disappearing at a rate of 1.35 million hectares a year. Fires, land-clearing for cash crops, and unsustainable logging are driving deforestation and forest degradation on a massive scale.

Global and regional resolve is building to reverse this trend. REDD+ initiatives promise rewards for restoration of forests. The Sustainable Development Goals call for restoration to achieve a “land-degradation-neutral world”. The Paris Agreement highlights the need to enhance forests as carbon sinks. And the Bonn Challenge, as the world’s biggest initiative for restoration, calls for global commitment to restore 150 million hectares of forest by 2020 and 350 million hectares by 2030.

Asia-Pacific countries have responded positively to these initiatives and instigated their own, including from governments, regional bodies, the private sector and civil society. The APEC Forest Cover 2020 Goal, for example, aims to restore 20 million hectares of forest in the region by 2020 – about 77 percent is estimated to have been achieved already.

But beyond meeting regional and international commitments, restoration efforts need to bring benefits for the entire forest landscape, including for people who depend on them for their livelihoods.

The Government of Brunei Darussalam, the host of the Summit, is looking to expand eco-tourism to find additional benefits for restored or protected forest landscapes. The country has already committed to protecting 22 million hectares in the Heart of Borneo, together with Indonesia and Malaysia, and has pledged to limit its agricultural use to one percent of its land area.

“It takes time to replant and regrow,” said panelist Noralinda Ibrahim, Acting Deputy Director of Brunei’s Forestry Department. “But we have managed to restore some areas as close as possible to their natural state.”

Panelist John Herbohn, Professor of Tropical Forestry from the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia, shared success stories of community-based forest landscape restoration in the Philippines.

After reforestation efforts failed four times over 20 years, the switch to a landscape approach finally found success in the Philippines’ Biliran Province, Herbohn said. The results improved biodiversity, food security and market access for forest products, and increased income for local people.

One key to success was to balance reforestation efforts with local needs for agroforestry and agriculture in a diverse forest landscape.

“There is a difference of experience between governments and communities,” he said. “For communities, diverse landscapes work best.”

RAINFOREST RESILIENCE

Ferry Slik, an Assistant Professor at the University of Brunei Darussalam, reminded the panel that a diverse forest landscape is not only good for human wellbeing, but also for biodiversity.

“The more diversity there is, the better the chance of survival,” he said.

Slik said that from a biologist’s point of view, there’s no problem with developing land, so long as a network of original forest fragments can be retained – and that requires careful planning.

Even in cases where careful planning hasn’t been applied, hope for successful restoration can still be found in the natural resilience of species, he said. He pointed to the example of devastating forest fires on the island of Borneo, saying that many of the original species can still be found there.

“The forest can recover by itself,” he said. “Even after burning, it can still recover.”

This research forms part of the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

  • Home
  • FTA event coverage: What does the Paris Agreement mean for the Asia-Pacific?

FTA event coverage: What does the Paris Agreement mean for the Asia-Pacific?

Posted by

FTA


On the sidelines of the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit: Peter Holmgren, Director General of the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Josh Frydenberg, Australian Minister for the Environment and Energy, and Dato Ali Apong, Brunei Minister of Primary Resources and Tourism, talk about the importance of Asia’s forests for the climate.

Leaders in public, private and community sectors from across the Asia-Pacific gathered to discuss the future of the region’s forests at the Summit held from 3-5 August in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam.

The event was hosted by the Government of Brunei Darussalam, and supported by the Australian Government as the coordinating partner, with CIFOR as the science and engagement partner.

Visit the event website: http://www.cifor.org/asia-pacific-rai…
and join the conversation #APRS16

  • Home
  • FTA event coverage: Highlights from the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit

FTA event coverage: Highlights from the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit

Posted by

FTA


By Leona Liu, originally published at CIFOR’s Forests News

The Summit’s 300+ participants brought perspectives from across geographic and sectoral boundaries to discuss ways toward a more integrated approach to forests, people and the region.

Global momentum is building to sustainably manage forests and landscapes, as a key factor for mitigating climate change and promoting development.

The Asia-Pacific, a dynamic region with rich natural assets, will be a crucial focus of this movement going forward. Rainforests in the Asia-Pacific account for 26 percent of the region’s land area, and support the livelihoods of some 450 million people.

Building on global commitments under the Paris Agreement and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, the 2016 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit, brought together stakeholders from government, business, civil society and the research community to catalyze practical action on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and achieving sustainable development in the region.

The Summit, held from 3-5 August in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam, was hosted by the Government of Brunei Darussalam and supported by the Australian Government.

In the video below, event participants including Peter Holmgren, Director General of CIFOR; Josh Frydenberg, Australia’s Minister for the Environment and Energy; and Dato Ali Apong, Brunei’s Minister of Primary Resources and Tourism, discuss the importance of integration- both across the region and between the private and public sectors – to achieve impact.

  • Home
  • Situating smallholders at the fore

Situating smallholders at the fore

Posted by

FTA

Photo: Achmad Ibrahim/CIFOR
A child rests amid felled trees in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Achmad Ibrahim/CIFOR

By Deanna Ramsay, originally published at CIFOR’s Forests News

Mediating the push and pull of agricultural expansion and conservation is no easy task. Add to that smallholders – who play a crucial role in producing agricultural commodities but whose economic disenfranchisement can incline to unsustainable practices – and the situation becomes even more complex.

With increasing corporate commitments to eliminate deforestation from supply chains, the integral, and precarious, situation of smallholders must be addressed. But how can companies help to empower them, disincentivizing deforestation and unsustainable practices? What must government, civil society and the financial sector do? And, what would a successful smallholder empowerment project look like?

At the upcoming Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit (APRS) in Brunei from 3 to 5 August, these questions will be discussed by diverse representatives from government, business, civil society and the research community.

In an interview on the sidelines of the recent Global Landscapes Forum: The Investment Case, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) principal scientist Pablo Pacheco – who will be chairing the smallholder session at APRS – addressed the thorny question of smallholders, investing and sustainability.

A lot of private sector investment today – in spite of all the capital – doesn’t seem to always reach smallholders. Any observations?

That depends whose sector we’re looking at. I think there’s a large amount of smallholders that don’t have access to capital. But there’s a small group of smallholders who embrace more commodity crops and they are more connected to companies and global markets who have some access to capital because that capital comes through the agreements that these smallholders have with companies.

And if they have access to some sources of funding or finance, often they have access to informal markets. Because in many cases it is the intermediaries who provide the capital to smallholders. But the fact is that the capital that’s coming from informal sources tends to be more flexible for smallholders. It works for smallholders in some contexts but it’s much more expensive. The money is less reliable. So they have access to capital, but it’s much more expensive.

I think the problem of smallholder finance has been how to make this access to capital more affordable.

Do you think over the years there has been improvement? In terms of private sector investment, has it managed to benefit smallholders?

That depends. I think there’s a portion of the private sector that has been able to build links with smallholders through outgrowing schemes. And I think you have companies that have been able to provide capital to smallholders, and not just capital but also technical assistance and to build the services into the links that they have for smallholders.

They have to ensure that they have enough quality of supply and stable supply coming from these outgrower smallholders. But the fact is that now companies are making commitments to source supply that is clean, that is deforestation free. And I think that’s one of the main issues that they’re struggling with is how to build these clean sources of supply that involve smallholders.

But that is going to imply for them to build some kind of agreements with these groups of smallholders that are supplying these companies. So that’s the big issue. Because the majority of smallholders are independent smallholders, like in the oil palm sector in Indonesia.

And who do you think should pay for the costs of smallholders transitioning to these more sustainable means of production?

I think what is needed is business models that are able to share those costs – share the cost, share the risks and share the benefits. Because in most of the cases you have business models that then transfer the costs to the producers that are upstream in the supply chains. So they are the ones who pay for the cost. In an ideal situation, the companies also should be able – if they are targeting deforestation free in markets – they should be able if there is some reward to transfer the rewards upstream in the value chains.

So the smallholders can also benefit or receive some compensation on the costs that they are investing in improving the production systems. But that is still an open question, and we don’t know if that’s going to work in that way.

What can the financial sector and banks do today to help the livelihoods of smallholders?

They are in a difficult position. Because even though they may have the willingness and the capital available for investing with smallholders, the transaction costs are very high for them to provide this capital to smallholders. So they really need these microfinance institutions, cooperatives, these aggregators. Channeling the money through aggregators could be a way to reduce the transaction costs of that lending.

  • Home
  • Indonesia’s timber going green – and global

Indonesia’s timber going green – and global

Workers moving teak (Teactona grandis) logs to transport to sawmills. Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Photo: Dita Alangkara/CIFOR
Posted by

FTA

Workers moving teak (Teactona grandis) logs to transport to sawmills. Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Photo: Dita Alangkara/CIFOR
Workers moving teak (Teactona grandis) logs to transport to sawmills. Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Photo: Dita Alangkara/CIFOR

By Deanna Ramsay, originally published at CIFOR’s Forests News

Forests provide both environmental benefits and economic opportunities. Striking a balance between the two – especially in developing countries where forests are being depleted and livelihoods can be precarious – is critical.

For pulp and paper, plywood and furniture producers in Indonesia, billions of dollars in investment is flowing into the country, together with increasing pressures for sustainability assurances in exports.

Ahead of the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit in Brunei 3-5 August, Herry Purnomo, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) scientist and Bogor Agricultural University professor, said the entire region was struggling with how to turn forest extractive industries green. Research on timber and other commodities is a key theme of the CGIAR Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry.

“It is no easy task. Deforestation is happening and institutions and governance need to be strong to address sustainable forestry,” Purnomo said.

Indonesia established its Timber Legality Verification System (SLVK) in 2013, a scheme that certifies wood was harvested legally and required for exports to Europe, the United States and Australia.

If Indonesia obtains a license under the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT), the careful, creative work of this wood carver in Jepara could enter markets he had no access to before. Photo: Dita Alangkara/CIFOR
If Indonesia obtains a license under the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT), this wood carver in Jepara could enter markets he had no access to before. Photo: Dita Alangkara/CIFOR

Abdullah Rufi’ie, director of forest products processing and marketing with the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry, said, “Since this legality, the value of our timber exports has increased, and we have been exporting more certified timber.”

At the source

The increasing demand around the world for sustainably sourced wood and wood products has implications on the ground. Indonesia’s legal timber certification means the country now has expanded access to markets, and the supply must follow.

For Purnomo, where this wood will come from is the question.

“Every year the amount of timber cut from natural forests has decreased, along with forest concessions. And some forest concession areas have been converted to oil palm and other uses.

“How can we continue providing timber products at the same level?”

Rufi’ie said the new sustainability requirements entailed wise use of source materials.

“The trend now is to obtain raw material from private forests and community forests, especially in Java. People are planting fast-growing teak species that can be used for furniture – and there is increasing demand because the wood is widely available and of good quality,” he said.

Teak forest in Jepara, Central Java. Photo: Murdani Usman/CIFOR
Teak forest in Jepara, Central Java. Photo: Murdani Usman/CIFOR

Many markets

Following SLVK, Indonesia is in the process of obtaining the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) license for its timber trade. This will allow Indonesia’s timber to easily enter EU markets, bypassing strict timber regulation requirements.

In a recent op-ed in The Jakarta Post, Purnomo wrote, “If realized, [FLEGT] would improve the livelihoods of millions of small-scale furniture producers and craftspeople in a country where 98 percent of furniture making is done by small and medium enterprises.”

Purnomo’s Furniture Value Chain Project with CIFOR has worked with such craftspeople since 2008 to improve the furniture value chain in Jepara, on the north coast of East Java.

With FLEGT licensing, the careful, creative work of people in Jepara and other towns in Indonesia could enter markets they had no access to before, increasing incomes for millions of people. But there are other markets aside from the EU.

Rufi’ie discussed plans for agreements with other countries that have specific timber certification guidelines.

“We are trying to get mutual recognition agreements with many countries. But our system doesn’t only consist of exports but imports as well, and we want to ensure that any timber that enters our supply chain is legal, demonstrated with certificates of origin and legality,” he said.

For Purnomo, the domestic market is important. “There is a lot in the domestic market to work on,” he said.

More investment into sustainable practices is needed to boost exports and encourage the domestic market, as well as supporting small and medium businesses’ moves to sustainability.

At the Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit (APRS) in Brunei from 3 to 5 August, ways to support domestic, regional and global markets for sustainable products were be discussed by representatives from government, business, civil society and the research community.

In the session titled “Inclusive forest industries for a green economy”, panelists will delve into managing the shift from unsustainable forest industries and how to improve forest certification.

“Five million hectares of certified forest after 20 years of certification in Indonesia is not good at all. Indonesia needs to double or triple this figure in the next five years,” Purnomo said.

Indonesia’s timber, especially with FLEGT to be finalized later this year, is tied to international markets, and finding ways to manage this process sustainably to support small-scale and informal contributors is key to many conservation goals.

Purnomo said, “Timber legality is just one step toward ensuring the sustainability of Indonesia’s forests and reducing carbon emissions, conserving biodiversity and improving the livelihoods of forest-dependent people.”


Back to top

Sign up to our monthly newsletter

Connect with us