Planning a sustainable future for Rupununi fisheries in Guyana

Posted by

Fraser, B.

The vast savannah in Guyana’s southern Rupununi region has varying moods. From April through August, the rainy season, it turns into a shimmering water world. By February, parts will be tinder-dry, sometimes fueling wildfires that rage across the grassland. During seasonal flooding, waters from Amazonian rivers mix with those of a watershed that drains into the Atlantic. Fish from both river systems swim upstream to spawn in lakes and ponds, giving the region remarkable aquatic biodiversity. This rich freshwater fishery has long been a key source of food for the people of the Rupununi — Wapishana, Makushi and Wai-wai Amerindians, as well as descendants of British colonists and the indentured servants and slaves they brought to work in the colony.

Source link: Planning a sustainable future for Rupununi fisheries in Guyana


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